6 Best Cruising Skateboard Wheels (Bought & Tested)

By Billy James | Updated: May 11, 2022 | Cruiser Skateboards

Cruising with small, hard wheels isn’t a fun time.

If that sounds like your situation, it’s time for some soft skateboard wheels.

Over the past few years, I’ve tested a bunch of cruising wheels. Simply because I had no idea where to start.

I’ll share my top wheel brands so that you don’t have to guess if they’re ‘good’ or not.

If you buy any of these brands, you can rest assured you’re buying something solid.

What are the best skateboard wheels for cruising?

I’d recommend looking into Orangatang, Hawgs, Fireball, Powell Peralta, OJ & Seismic. Those brands use quality urethane formula you can’t go wrong with. Depending on your setup, go for a 55-70mm size. Keep in mind, you’ll probably have to add riser pads to prevent wheelbite.

Things to consider

Before we dive into the brands, let’s cover the characteristics of cruiser wheels.

The things you want to consider are the size of the wheel, urethane hardness, lip profile, and core placement.

Wheel Size

You’ll want something beefier than an average street wheel so you can reach higher speeds. Remember, a small wheel will accelerate faster, but a larger wheel will have a higher top speed. Your setup probably has traditional kingpin trucks, which will offer less clearance than reverse kingpins. Wheelbite is a serious consideration when picking your wheel size. You’ll most likely have to add thicker riser pads.

Bottom Line: I usually go for 60-65mm diameter wheels, but it’s all personal preference. If you’re swapping from smaller street wheels, you’ll need thicker riser pads.

Urethane Durometer

Another thing you’ll need to consider is the softness/hardness of your wheel. The higher the number (101a), the harder the wheel. Usually, street skateboards use wheels 99a+. But what works with a street setup won’t be ideal for a cruising skateboard. You’ll want a softer wheel so it absorbs rougher terrain, making for a smoother ride.

Bottom Line: I’d suggest looking in the 78a-85a range for cruising skateboard wheels.

Lip Profile

The lip profile is the edge of the wheel. There are different variations but to keep it simple, you can either get a sharp lip or rounded lip. The purpose of a sharp lip is to grip the pavement more effectively when doing hard carves. And the rounded lips are easy to break traction if you want to powerslide.

Bottom Line: Go for a sharp lip wheel if you don’t want to break traction when doing hard carves. Rounded lip wheel if you want it to be easier to powerslide.

Core Placement

The core is another important aspect to consider when choosing a cruising wheel. Offset cores are placed closer to one side, which provides more grip when carving. Centerset cores are placed directly in the center (obviously) and will be easier to slide.

Bottom Line: Offset core if you want more grip when doing deep carving. Centerset core if you want an easier time sliding.

Fireball

60mm Tinders

Durometer: 81a

Lip Profile: Rounded

Core Placement: Centerset

Buy on Fireball's website
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Fireball is the new kid on the block. The brainchild from the guys over at Stoked Ride Shop. The urethane they use is solid and they offer a variety of different sizes. If you’re looking for a great cruiser wheel, look no further. Better if you want a wheel that’s easier to powerslide because of the stone-ground contact patch and rounded lips.

OJ Wheels

60mm Super Juice

Durometer: 78a

Lip Profile: Sharp

Core Placement: Centerset

Buy on Tactic's website
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Similar to Powell, OJ has been around for a long time. They’ve been manufacturing their wheels since the 70s. It’s safe to say they know what they’re doing. Anytime I ask people what their favorite cruiser wheel is, the Super Juice always comes up.

Hawgs

63mm Fatty Hawgs

Durometer: 78aa

Lip Profile: Rounded

Core Placement: Offset

Buy on Landyachtz website
We do not have an affiliate partnership with Landyachtz.

Hawgs is Landyachtz’s wheel company. I’ve tried a bunch of their wheelsets and their urethane formula never disappoints. Since they’ve been around for over a decade, they have a bunch of different sets to choose from. The Fatty Hawgs are a great wheel for cruising and I have them on several of my setups.

Powell Peralta

63mm Powell Cruiser

Durometer: 80a

Lip Profile: Sharp

Core Placement: Centerset

Buy on Powell's website
We do not have an affiliate partnership with Powell Peralta.

Powell Peralta was and still is one of the first major skateboard companies. It’s a brand you can trust – they make everything in-house, making their quality control next level. Good urethane for a fair price. I picked up their cruiser skateboard wheels and they’re solid. If you want softer wheels for doing tricks, they got you covered.

Seismic

63mm Hot Spot

Durometer: 81a - 92a

Lip Profile: Sharp

Core Placement: Offset

Buy on Seismic's website
We do not have an affiliate partnership with Seismic.

Seismic is a well-respected longboard brand from Boulder, Colorado. They started back in 1993 by launching the first high-precision truck. In the past few decades, they expanded into other products, like wheels. I really enjoy their Hot Spot wheels for cruising. You can tell they’ve spent a ton of time getting the urethane dialed.

Orangatang

65mm Love Handles

Durometer: 77a - 81a

Lip Profile: Sharp

Core Placement: Offset

Buy on Orangatang's website Find a local shop
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Orangatang is Loaded Board’s wheel company. They started in 2008 and offer wheels from 62mm (Skiffs) all the way to 85mm (Caguamas). Personally, I’ve been using their wheels since 2011 and have always had a solid experience. Their urethane formula is dialed!

Bottom Line

Whichever cruiser skateboard wheel you choose from this list, you’ll be in good hands. All of the brands on this list you can trust, based on their many years of experience.

Billy James

I started skateboarding when I was 5 years old. Picked up surfing and snowboarding soon after. These days, if I'm not surfing, I'm trying to replicate it on land or snow. My goal is to shred, then share my thoughts in an honest and transparent way.
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